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AISI 1080, 1084 and 80CRV2

Heat treating of these three steels is virtually the same and you can include 15N20 in the list as well. A common combination for pattern welded steel would be 1080/15N20 since they both heat treat the same.

If you are using a combination like 1095/15N20 in a pattern welded billet then you would heat treat the combination as if it were 1095.

CHEMICAL COMPOSITION NOMINAL %


80CRV2 (nominal) %

C

Si

Mn

P

S

Cr

V

0.82

0.22

0.42

≤0.040

≤0.05

0.60

0.20

1080 (nominal) %

C

Si

Mn

P

S

Cr

V

0.81

0.22

0.75

≤0.040

≤0.05

-

-

1084 (nominal) %

C

Si

Mn

P

S

Cr

V

0.86

0.22

0.75

≤0.040

≤0.05

-

-

15N20 (nominal) %

C

Si

Mn

P

S

Cr

Ni

0.75

0.10

0.40

≤0.10

-

-

2.00


Recommended Working Sequence


Forging:

Heat steel up to 2150 °F (1175 °C). Do not forge below 1500 °F (815 °C)

Annealing:

Heat to 1500 °F (815 °C). Furnace cool to 1200 °F (650 °C) at a rate not exceeding 50 °F (28 °C) per hour.

Grinding, Drilling or Machining

Normalizing:

Heat to 1600 °F (870 °C). Cool in still air, this can be repeated up to three times if needed. Best practices for many bladesmiths is to repeat the cycle three times in order too achieve the finest grain structure possible so no harm in copying them.

Hardening:

Austenitize- Heat to 1500 °F (815 °C).
In sections thicker than 1/4" can be they quenched in water or brine with extreme care.
In sections under 1/4 inch thick (6.35 mm) oil quench is the preferred method, water quenching thin sections would be to fast and lead too broken blades.

Tempering:

As-quenched hardness of approximately 65 HRC may be achieved with a fast oil.
Tempering cycle is recommended to be twice for two hours each time. Use the table below to achieve desired hardness.
Hardness can be adjusted downward by proper tempering.


Level of hardness achieved will be greatly influenced by type of quenching oil used. Hardness after quenching should be verified before selecting a tempering temperature, tempering temperature will be lowered or raised as needed to achieve the final hardness desired.

Stock removal:

Steels are typically supplied in the spheroidized annealed state and will require no further heat treating before being worked.

Grinding, Drilling or Machining

Some people like to add in a Normalizing step after shaping the blade. I have not done this to date and this is the type of grain structure I have on either carbon steels or stainless steels.


Normalizing step if desired - See Forging

Hardening:

Austenitize- Heat to 1500 °F (815 °C).
In sections thicker than 1/4" can be they quenched in water or brine with extreme care.
In sections under 1/4 inch thick (6.35 mm) oil quench is the preferred method, water quenching thin sections would be to fast and lead to broken blades.


For those who always look for extra information here are all of the relevant diagrams for heat treating 1080 steel.




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